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an opportunity before we turn to our witnesses. the debate over stand your ground laws raises fundamental questions about self-defense in the be united states of america. in recent years we've seen a dramatic increase in laws expanding the situation in which a person can legally use deadly force in response to a perceived threat. florida passed the first of this new wave of stand your ground laws in 2005. prior to 2005, florida law held that a person outside his home could not use deadly force and then claim self-defense if the person could have safely avoided the confrontation. this, quote, duty of safe retreat, closed quote, sought to prevent public disputes from escalating into violence. but the gun lobby pushed to change florida's law so people could shoot someone who threatened them without first trying to avoid a confrontation. florida wasn't the first state to adopt the stand your ground principle, but florida's 2005 law expanded the principle in several dramatic new ways. first, the law grants criminal and civil of immunity for use withs of deadly force -- for uses of deadly force
." that's because he found out that his policy, which came into effect just two months after the law's arbitrary cutoff date for grandfathered plans, will be discontinued next year. and he's not happy about this at all. especially given the fact that a plan on the obamacare exchanges will dramatically drive up his insurance costs from $400 a month to more than $700 a month with zero subsidies available. here's what he had to say. he said my wife and i are 54. we don't need maternity care, and we don't need obamacare. well, he's right to be upset. this is simply not in keeping with the spirit of the president's oft-repeated promise. perhaps the administration would like to tell him he should have just done a better job of keeping up with its regulatory dictates. but what about the millions who purchased their plans relying on the president's promise that they could keep them? what about the husbands and wives across kentucky who suffered when two of our largest employers had to drop spousal coverage? what about the folks who lost coverage at work? what about all the smaller paychecks
of blacks who claim soft defense understand your ground law are convicted at much lower rates than other racial groups? is not all also these cases are the same. blacks are killed in confrontations where -- were 13 percentage points more likely to be armed than whites. blacks,lled by other the were more often in process of committing other crimes. they were involved in cases where was likely to have a witness. if you run regressions where you try to call all the factors that were brought up in the data set, you find that white defendants are more likely to be convicted by black defendants, and people invoking stand your ground laws who kill blacks are also more likely to be convicted than those who killed whites. what you find when you look at it, the people who initiate confrontation were more likely to be convicted, and when there were eyewitnesses, they were less likely to be convicted. armed individuals were more likely to result in convictions. the urban institute report that is brought up earlier or think shows the opposite of what has been quoted here. mention,tant thing to the p
received overwhelming number of stories from my constituents with concerns about the health care law. >> 23,000 are losing access to the state sponsored program which covered those with preexisting conditions, seniors and small children and small businesses. one small business owner, greg from my district shared this story with me. i want to share this with diane. i operate a small painting business and very happy with the cover tennessee program for small businesses and their employees. it had a small co-pay and covered up to $25,000 each year. it covered 12 doctors visits and annual physical at reasonable costs and this is being canceled effective january 2014 because it does not meet the requirements of obama care. this directly contradicts the comments made by president obama that we could keep our existing program. they had affordable health care that they liked but they didn't get to keep that. and i ask, is this right or is this just for this group of people. these 28,000 citizens of tennessee are now forced to find new coverage plans on the health care website there are people out t
hearing on stand your ground laws. itnesses include the mother of trayvon mar on the. you'll hear from supporters of the law that currently exist in one form or another in as many as 30 states h. is an hour and a alf. >> can i ask you all to please stand. it is customary to administer the oath before the subcommittee. will your testimony be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so hope you god? let the record reflect that the witnesses answered in the affirmative. each witness will be given five minutes for an opening statement. any written statement will be admitted without objection. our first witness is sabrina fulton. she is the mother of trayvon martin. her son was shot and killed at the age of 17 on the night of february 26, 2012 in sanford, florida. his parents have created a foundation to provide support and advocacy for the victims of violent crimes. she is a graduate of florida memorial university. thank you for coming here today. please proceed with your testimony. >> thank you so much for taking the time to listen to what i have to say and the rest of the p
it's only the federal government has an estimated 5000 or so criminal laws that have over criminalized this country. hopefully when i am here again for a hearing weekend fervently work toward eliminating or correcting the thousands of federal laws that have sometimes put people behind bars for things that most americans have no clue would be against the criminal law. so senators i humbly implore you let's leave state criminal law to the consideration of the state legislatures though we in congress will probably be well served to take advice from the states that are still solvent. thank you. >> thank you congressman gohmert and i want to thank your college scholars from the tear is in congressman fudge for their testimony as well. we appreciate your being here today and we are going to proceed to the second panel as you depart. thank you again. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> i'm sorry. if i can ask you all to please stand. it's customary to give the oath before this committee. if you please raise your right hand. view from the testimony you're about
that these are just real americans committed to following the law and catching bad guys at the end of the day. it's important we get to the privacy issues that are important. i just wanted to ask this particular question. i dpsh some talk about a permanent advocate in the fisa court. i scratch my head a bit, and i can't find that anywhere else, and in a criminal grand jury, there's no advocate on behalf of the person they're seeking indictment; is that correct? >> that's correct. there's no advocate, and even when a witness goes in a grand jury, they don't go in and are not allowed to go in with an attorney, and in particular, probably the closest am ji is the acquisition of a wiretap for domestic criminal law enforcement, and that doesn't involve any sort of adversary process at all, but an ex parte process with the government or agent going in similar to the fisa process we have now. >> and by design, the court was supposed to be that adversary -- too strong a word -- but to check the compliance with the law and constitution; is that correct? >> correct. this is the constitutional protection th
go to law school, he's a lawyer. imagine a black person goes to elite law school, graduate from law school, and when that person goes for a job, let's say at an elite law firm for six to get a job with a distinguished judge, or seeks to get a job at any place selective. the person that's going to be assessing this candidate is going to mark down the candidate to some degree because of affirmative action. the person who is assessing the candidate knows that the school has affirmative action, and by the way, virtually every selective law school in the united states has affirmative action. so if you have a black person who has graduated, graduate from harvard law school or graduate from where he went to school, yale law school. they go to the fancy firm, sure, they've got a nice brownie points they went to this fancy law school, but what he has in mind is the person accessing the candidate will say, yes, this person has a nice halo of having gone to yale law school or harvard law school, but the person doing the assessment is going to dim that halo. the person is going to say, this per
. for the first time really since watergate when we got the scandal that led to the laws we have today in large part, we saw the money pouring in in a completely unprecedented way. it is only going to get bigger or worse if you do not think that is the way it should be in 2014 and especially 2016. host: let's go to matt on our line for independents in plano, texas. caller: think you for telling -- taking my call. good morning, andy. --anted to ask i do not think it past congress? is that correct? we ended up with a neutered version of it that did not cover congressional staff. that surprised me. i remember hearing stories about staff involved with the scandal in a bank. that is the biggest problem. you look at all the money coming into elections and the so-called notpendent tax that are independent. it worries me that congress is using these committees to, you know, enrich themselves. can weed out some of this dark money going into congress. so, we start getting them in are just going to see more. it's just going to continue. host: andy kroll, we want to point out a highlighted piece from june
and discusses how it has shaped the copyright laws that we have today and this is about one hour. [applause] >> thank you so much. as the dean indicated, most of us and a large number of legal scholars, you might be surprised to learn that an area that is not compelled by law, something that is informal but very organized, and it has grown up to fill the various needs and the various cracks in the wall of law and i am going to be talking about one of those major cracks in the law today and i will be focused on the 19th century in the united states and particularly on authors and publishers in america, really from the 1820s and 30s amah up to lease the end of the century where, as you will see, the world is really kind of turned upside down where publishing is concerned. lawful piracy is still regarded as piracy and yet it was lawful. and uncopyrighted works well protected by an informal system of rights that were recognized by publishers and how could this be and the answer lies in some of these mysteries of informal norms that exist alongside the law and sometimes even in place of the law.
law attorney seth. dr. scott, i start with you, this is an amazing story that president promises we can keep our health insurance coverage knowing that likelihood is 47% to 60% would close their coverage each year, millions of americans without coverage, he promised us the opposite. what do you make of this? >> this is an irs bulle but -- - >> bottom line is that i think they were anticipating the people would lose their coverage, and move into the exchanges. these are most lo lucrative, i suspect they would move on to plans they would like more, we're finding right now options are worse than they should in costs and benefit design. >> we've seen people say, they see increased costs but administration reporting that young people, individuals will see costs on their policies of just $50 a month, i have to tell you, i have not seen that in talking with anybody on our show. what do you think of the back and forth, a give and take between the white house and media on the topics? >> i think that it demonstrates that administration is not only not in control of what is going on, but they
testifying this afternoon. law makers want to know how long it is going on and who knew about it. the white house said president obama did not know that the nsa was monitoring the phone calls. >> lou dobbes makes a good point. you wonder how much of that sebelius will talk about tomorrow? >> you wonder if they know? >> or her answer every time they badger her with a question. >>> law makers looking to the answer to so many questions of what the government knew and web site. what do the web site delays mean for the implementation of the law. >>> one year ago today a monster storm settled over the northeast affecting millions of people and the recovery and progress made since super storm sandy. >>> and bringing terrorist to justice on benghazi. we'll talk on a law makers looking for that exact answer, next. >> every time i see this on tv, i see bloody finger prints crawling down the wall and i keep asking everybody. do they belong to my son? and no one has told me anything. [ indistinct conversations ] [ male announcer ] when you wear dentures you may not know it, but your mouth is under atta
the massachusetts health care law. the same law that become the framework for the affordable care act. i don't remember conservatives complaining about the law then. back then everyone was all smiles, even this guy. a top official at the conservative think tank, the heritage foundation. look how happy he is. but now suddenly the heritage foundation is the group leading the charge against the president's health care law. it's even supported senator ted cruz's anti-obama care tour this summer. and today senator cruz continued that crusade at the headquarters for the heritage foundation. >> it is a particular privilege being here at heritage, heritage plays such an important role in helping articulate and defend conservative principles across this country. and in no fight has that been more apparent than in the fight over obama care. >> but republicans were on the other side of that fight just a few years ago. they've completely flip-flopped. now the whole right wing is against it. why? because president obama is for it. but he's come too far to back down now. >> and if if was hard doing it jus
republican complaints the new health care law is forcing the cancellation of many existing insurance plans. hundreds of thousands of people who have purchased their own insurance have reportedly begun receiving notices that their plans will be canceled or changed because they no longer meet the loss coverage requirements. 26 palestiniand prisoners as part of the agreement that reopened u.s.- backed peace talks earlier this year. it is the second wave of the releases that will ultimately free 104 of the thousands of palestinians in israeli prisons. as jubilant crowds greeted the freed prisoners in the west bank and gaza, israel announced today it plans to construct 1500 new homes in an east jerusalem settlement. the u.s. brokered israeli- palestinian negotiations are continuing behind closed doors. in a statement ahead of the prisoner's, the top palestinian negotiator yasser abed rabbo said israel's current stance in the talks is its most hardline in over 20 years. he said israel is seeking to hold onto major parts of the occupied west bank, "undermining the possibility of establishing ,"so
of the most restrictive abortion laws in the country and there was a major ruling late today. >>> taking a hit. a stunner from consumer reports. some of the most popular cars on a the the road are no longer recommended. >>> and the babies born in the middle of a natural disaster now thriving as their first birthdays arrive. "nightly news" begins now. >>> good evening. among industrialized nations, spying is considered something everybody does but nobody likes to talk about. the problem for the u.s. right now is everybody is talking about it and each day seems to bring a new allegation concerning the extent to which the u.s. has spied on other nations, especially our allies and friends. it's all coming from one man, edward snowden and the secrets he made off before he left as a u.s. intelligence analyst. now the white house is scrambling to soothe feelings while fielding questions about how much the president knew. we begin in washington tonight with nbc's andrea mitchell. andrea, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, brian. the white house is under fire from its closest allies. for the firs
at the same time, it must the united states department of justice and constrained by the rule of law balances ecks and built into our brilliant design by our nation's founders. a tension relate flekted in those two aspects of fidelity. two values that i see in that word. and that was detect in the ten-year term i've just begun. ten years to ensure independence and it's a fixed years to ensure the power is not concentrated in one person and unconstrained. the need for reflection and restraint of power is what led order all new agent classes visit the olocaust museum here in washington so they could see and way and hear in a palpable the consequences of abusive massive almost unimaginable scale. ob mueller continue that practice and i will again when we have agents graduating from quantico. the balance reflected in my term is also a product of lessons history ofd from the this great institution. our first half century or so is time of great progress and achievement in this country and bureau. but it saw abuse and overreach. most famously with respect to martin luther king and others. as i think
in this law. >> rolling disaster. >> i have a constituent. he received this cancellation letter. the president knew that these letters were coming. >> we are talking strictly about the 14 million people in the individual market. >> jay carney at the briefing effectively said -- >> there are going to be changes brought about by the affordable care act to create minimum standards. >> they can't be dropped for a richer package of benefits. >> maternity care, mental health services. >> this is government-run health care. >> i'll never stop fighting to help more hard-working americans know the economic security of health care. ♪ >> don't you worry. we will get to health care momentarily. but it is a very busy day in the capitol with a double dose of major congressional hearings, and challenges on twin fronts for the president. issue number one. oversight of the nsa. you are looking live right now at the house intelligence committee holding a hearing on that very issue. witnesses include the director of national intelligence, james clapper, who sounded a wri note on the outrage over
this law work. they voted over 40 times to repeal the law. they shut down the government and threatened to force a default in order to stop it. they're rooting for failure. madam secretary, can you tell us what would be the impact on americans health insurance if republicans had been successful in their efforts to defund or repeal the affordable care act? >> well, i think that the estimates of the congressional budget office is that would have increased the deficit by about $110 billion in the first decade and close to a trillion dollars in the second decade. we know that we have 42 or 43 million americans without health insurance at all, some of them medicaid eligible and some over the medicaid eligibility. 30 governors so far, republicans and democrats, have declared their support for moving ahead with medicaid expansion, but absent that, the affordable care act, those folks would be without any kind of health security. and in the private market, what we know is it takes a real toll. but i'd say the biggest issue is not just the financial toll, not the community toll, not the country
be grandfathered in. >> she's lying because the grandfather clause for those plans, right in the law, had an old list of exceptions that made the grandfather clause meaningless. compare it with the grandfather clause for unions in the very next paragraph where there, that is guaranteed period, as the president said, without the long string of fine print to make it meaningless. stuart: got it. mr. waxman is on, getting political, go. >> he said tens of millions would lose their insurance, but in fact everybody in this country is going to have action cess to health insurance because they won't be discriminated against. they said that it would explode the deficit and yet the reputable organizations like the budget office says it's going to save 100 billion dollars over ten years. so we've had a litany of objections from the republicans about the affordable care act which has driven this to such a frenzy, they even closed the government. so, now, we have you before the committee and you're being asked, i suppose later you'll be asked about the website, but let me pursue this question about individua
they're in a union or not. mr. griffin has extensive experience in employment law. he's highly respected by his fellow labor lawyers on both the union and business sides. as general counsel for the nlrb he will safeguard fair compensation and working conditions for all american workers. this week the senate will also vote on a number of other crucial executive nominations. some of whom have been stalled for more than a year. the senate will consider the nomination of katherine archuleta to serve as director of the office of personnel management. that is an extremely important position. she started her career in public service as an elementty tri schoolteacher. she will be the agency's first hispanic director. this is what she said -- and i quote -- "you do it as public service because have you a deep passion for public good and civic engagement. that's her quote. she's working in both the transportation and energy departments under president clinton, she served as chief of staff to tib the the labor secretary hilda solis for three years. she is emintentsly qualified yet ms. arc
. >> any way. citing the first amendment the texas court of criminal appeals struck down a law that lawed sexually explicit communications between a judge and a minor. judge kathy cochran wrote the law was was too broad. she cited "50 shades of grey" and sha ed shakespeare. pervert will be free to cowoman bombard or children. how do the perverts feel? here is tape from outside the courthouse. it's amazing. i had no idea. there's 40 to 50 million perverts that are rejoying. tom, good to see you as usual. >> good to be back. >> it's great day for perverts, ie, you. >> at first i thought this judge was off her rocker. i thought this is a victory for perverts. she made a good point. the law prohibits and punishes is speech or already prohibited by other stuff. i'm really doing this. i'm arguing the facts. the thing is all of these terrible things one might do, it's already prohibited by other laws. this is what gets me. i say enough laws. if they are covered by other laws don't pass new ones. i agree with the judge. >> i don't know about that. i think she's saying talk dirty to minors. >> gre
, remember when a texas lawmaker filibustered a strict new abortion law only to have the legislature pass it anyway in a special session? well, a u.s. district judge just threw that law out. good afternoon, everyone. welcome to "the lead." i'm jake tapper. in the national lead, we begin by asking of the president those two questions that always seem to go hand in hand. what did he know and when did he know it. regarding the nsa tapping the phones of nearly three dozen world leaders. add president obama himself to the list of those surprised to learn it was going on. a senior administration official tells me president obama did not learn until recently of the nsa surveillance of other world leaders including allies, confirming a report that first appeared in this morning's "wall street journal," citing u.s. officials that the white house did not know until an internal review over the summer after which it ended some of those programs. the senior administration official tells me the program that monitored the phone of german chancellor angela merkel did not end until quite recently. the whi
, found buried in the 2010 language of the law, an estimate that because of normal turnover, normal turnover in the individual insurance market, 40 to 67% of customers will not be able to keep their policy. developments comes as the head of the government agency in charge of the health the website has been grilled for hours. there have been heated moments including democrat congressman bill pascrell of new jersey, accusing of his republican counterparts of refusing to help people sign up for the law the way democrats helped in the part of medicare part d eight years ago. >> we went back to districts and told seniors, although we voted no, we personally believe and will work with the bush administration to make it work. that's what we did. and how many of you stood up to do that? none. zero. zero. let's talk. let's not water the wine here. let's say it like it is. >> let me bring in "washington post" national political reporter malia henderson and wendell potter. we'll have congressman pascrell in a second. but let's start with the admission from steny hoyer that some polic
they put a name on. there's no law that says a title of a bill has to be truthful and sometimes that's how you can end up with a bill calling itself affordable care, when a majority lose their insurance, don't get for re they need or, example, find out in three to five years when they need a new pacemaker, the new law will not allow them to get it. those are problems. and what i have also found more and more of are senior citizens who are now beginning to figure out that when the aarp endorsed bamacare, i don't think it's disrespectful to the president justll the bill obamacare, as the president and others called the bill that governor omney signed in massachusetts, romneycare. i don't consider it disrespectful to former governor romney to call it romneycare. i don't think it's disrespectful to call the unaffordable care act obamacare. so no disrespect to the president intended by referring to his signature bill. but people have been hurt. people have been moved from full-time employment to part-time employment. they like their insurance policy, but then they found out they didn't get to
to discontinue the plans that people had when the law was passed, yes or no? >> not when the law was passed. no, sir. that's the grandfather clause. >> that's because the plans existed prior to passage of the law are grandfathered in as you have said? >> that's correct. >> so if an insurance company is no longer offering a certain plan, that's because that insurance company made a decision to change their policies and that caused them to take away the grandfather status from their insurance purchasers, is that right? >> that's correct. >> now, madame secretary. i want you to submit for the record a statement of what it is we can do about insurance companies that run around canceling the policies of their people and i don't have time to get the answer but i want to get a very clear statement from you as to what you can do so we can take some skin off some folks that have it coming. madame secretary, it's my understanding that these decisions of a business character are most common in the individual insurance market and that much turnover already exists and existed prior to the enactment of the l
of that law were found unconstitutional. one third of clinics were set to close their doors when the law would have gone into effect. one provision required doctors performing abortions to have admitting privileges of a hospital within 30 miles of that abortion facility. federal district judge wrote the admitting privileges provision of house bill 2 does not bear a rational relationship to the legitimate right of the state in preserving and promoting fetal life or a woman's health and in any event places a substantial obstacle in the path of a woman seeking an abortion of a non-viable fetus and is thus an undue burden to her. the judge struck down some of the law's restriks on the use of pills used to induce apportion. wendy davis issued this warning during her filibuster of the bill. >> i'd say if you vote for this bill you're simply happy to ignore medical science and watch women and children die for no reason. >> texas families are stronger and healthier when women across the state have access to quality health care. i would rather see our tax dollars spent on improving our kids' schools ra
. that is why allowing insurers to continue offering deficient plans next year is such a bad policy. the law says that all plans except those that were grandfathered in 2010, must meet the new consumer protection standards. if we don't enforce this policy, insurance companies can continue offering flimsy coverage that disappears when people actually need it and no one should want that. it is understandable that there will be a focus today on what isn't working, but we must also remember what is working. the health insurance plans that are being offered in the exchanges are good plans. the premiums are much lower than expected. 60% of the uninsured individuals shopping in the new marketplaces will be able to get coverage for less than $100 per month. half of the young adults will be able to get coverage for less than $50 per month. and since congress adopted the affordable care act, health care costs across the whole economy have grown at their lowest level in decades. the success of the affordable care act is due to the efforts of many people, but one individual more than any other is respon
clearly, there is a demand. we need to get information to people about the law. this is the law, this is not any longer a debate. it was a law passed by both houses of congress, signed by the president of the united states, upheld by the supreme court. the president was reelected. it is the law. and people have benefits and rights under that law, and we've got to get that information so they can make good choices for themselves and their families. >> well, thank you. it is the law, and, frankly, i find it disconcerting that my republican colleagues have done nothing but root for this law to fail for the last three and a half years. and now there's a big show here of being upset at problems with the website and keeping people from signing up for coverage fast enough. so i would just say to my colleagues on the other side of the aisle, you're really on the wrong side of history here. the website will be fixed and millions of americans will be able to get quality affordable health insurance coverage through the affordable care act. and again, i thank you for being here today, madam
>>> one month in now and the president's health care law is still down and out. welcome, everyone. i'm neil cavuto. early enrollment numbers are looking more than just dismal. they're getting frantic about it. word just today that some top hospitals are opting out. even if they fix this website, you cannot fix all of these other problems that go way beyond the website. doctor, this sounds to me the most alarming development of all. explain. >> absolutely, neil. thanks so much for having me. so, you know, the president's called in some google executives but the glitches are really a side show and the problems with obama care, the problems with the exchanges, they really can't be fixed by google and this raises several points. weren't they supposed to have the tech experts making the website to begin with and if they couldn't do it in 3 1/2 years, how are they supposed to do it in one month as the president has promised? >> what does that mean? you seem to be saying the tech site -- delays notwithstanding, the hospitals that don't want to be part of it or even the cleveland clinic w
moment dozens of senate republicans are expected to vote against a gay rights law that would ban discrimination against gay and lesbian employees in the workplace. that's 39 republicans who didn't get the memo. why? because they haven't learned anything. what about women's rights? republican senator lindsey graham is now launching a new fight against a woman's right to choose. calling for a 20-week abortion ban. >> i've been a pro-life member of congress since day one. i'm proud to lead this charge. >> todd akin was once proud to lead this charge. how'd that work out? again, they haven't learned anything. and this extreme ideology is particularly bad. look at virginia. the republican candidate for governor ken cuccinelli is as far right as they come. he thinks same-sex relationships are immoral, wants to ban abortions with no exception, and once said it's possible the president was born in kenya. and he's plunging in the polls. 12 points behind. so why is that? president obama was in virginia over the weekend with the answer. >> you've seen on extreme faction of the republican pa
the university reached an agreement with 26 victims today. texas passed one of the strictest abortion laws in the nation. today a federal judge had his say. anna werner reports. one year after hurricane sandy some residents are only now facing the loss of their homes. jim axelrod on the unintended consequences of a new law. and the boy with the bionic hand. new technology lets most anyone create the most amazing things. >> making your kids happy is like the most rewarding thing you can have as a dad. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening, in one of the biggest scandals ever in college sports penn state university said it will pay nearly $60 million to 26 men who say they were sexually abused as children by assistant football coach jerry sandusky. other claims are still pending. sandusky was convicted at trial of abusing ten boys, so the announcement today means there were many more victims than we thought. armen keteyian of "60 minutes sports" has been covering this from the start and has the latest developments tonight. >> re
from law school, the big law firms did not hire women. so i looked for a job, and it was very much ending when a door closes a window opens and i stopped at a television station and i walked down and said that i would like to apply for a job, and that ended up getting a job as a television news reporter and because i was a lawyer, he gave me a start and there was an obstacle course that i went through and i was elected to the legislature and then state treasurer and in the united states senate. >> wanted your family come to texas? >> my family came to texas in 1828 and they signed a texas declaration of independence and they came from england and made their way to texas and they were actually trained in the law and you had to be catholic to land in texas and he was a natural catholic. i say actual because many declared catholicism on the land. and he was part of this and he became the chief justice in this includes a great friend of sam houston and thomas rusk and my roots to go way back. >> kay hutchison is our guest and pioneering women who shaped texas, sally, good morning to yo
was targeting tsa agents, law enforcement officials saying as he was running down the terminal, he essentially was asking people hey, are you with tsa and when they said no he continued running, making his way down. third thing, also, information, there were texts that apparently he was sending in the days leading up to the attack we were just learning in which he was sending them to his father and brother and there was some concern about his situation about how -- what was going through his mind at the time. so these three things suggest in fact, he was looking to shoot tsa agents. that's the premise law enforcement officials are investigating. that's what they tell us, anderson. >> earlier reports said he was shot multiple times but survived. you're saying the shooter is dead? >> no, no, i didn't say that. the shooter was hit three times in the chest, center mass, hit multiple times but we don't know the condition. we've been trying to find out from hospitals throughout the course of the day because that's a significant wound as you can imagine. >> right, obviously. do we know much about his
yesterday. we want to remind viewers as we peel away the layers of this law from march of 2010 when then speaker of the house nancy pelosi said this about obamacare. >> but we have to pass the bill so that you can find out what is in it away from the fog of the controversy. >> now we're finding millions of americans could have their insurance dropped as a result. steve, want to p put you on pause in a moment. when we come back we'll talk about the politics. 10 any hoyer said yesterday the law should have been more precise. you wonder how many more democrats are falling into that way of thinking, but, steve, standby. there is sebelius in the room. martha has more. martha: shaking hand to say hello to everybody as she gets ready to go here. a lot of smiles and friendliness on way in. we'll she as she sits at table. the lead contractor on, warned her, warned hhs, the holt and human services website was not ready to go. so what under after that is one of the big questions that we expect kathleen sebellius will get. chris stirewalt joins me right now. that is the big issue
abortion law. the anti-abortion law attracted national attention this summer, not just for its severity, but also because of texas democratic senator wendy davis and her 13-hour-long filibuster, which temporarily thwarted republicans' plans to pass that law. despite that filibuster and despite large protests, texas republicans did get the law passed, and governor rick perry's signature on it set in motion a countdown to texas clinics that provide abortions having to shut down. the law had been set to go into effect on tuesday of this week, so a few days ago. and a dozen clinics in the state expected to have to close their doors that day. on monday, at the eleventh hour, a federal judge stepped in and blocked the implementation of the law, saying it was unconstitutional, so the clinic stayed open. but tonight, a higher federal court, the appeals court for the conservative fifth circuit has overturned the monday ruling, which clears the way for the law to go into effect, basically, right now. this ruling, late tonight, means that a third of the facilities that provide abortions for women
. the supreme court rejecting oklahoma's appeal to reinstate its strict law banning medical abortions, specifically those performed with the drug ru486 known as the abortion pill. the court initially agreed to take up the appeal this spring but later asked oklahoma's court to clarify what the law covered. the court responded by saying the measure effectively bans all medical abortions. that apparently wasn't enough for justices and now oklahoma's supreme court decision avoiding the law will remain intact. pete williams joins us live. this is one of a number of abortion related cases and high court is expected to consider soon. >> right, but consider the importance of what the court did here. as a technical legal matter, what the supreme court did here today, no presidential value and expressed no view on the laws and said we're not going to hear this case after all. consider the fact in the spring when it looked like enthuse law in oklahoma was to restrict not to ban the use of ru486 and one other pill for medicinal purposes the supreme court was willing to look at that. oklahoma said
secret activity, it almost seems like a contradiction. how do you address laws that we don't want to talk about in public? democraticke a fully function and the government will fully comply, but how do you write about things that the government doesn't want to talk about? >> we can talk about the purpose of the program in the framework for the program. certainly, i recall very specifically in the debate on the fisa amendments in 2008, that is what we did. maybe members of congress for not paying much attention, but it was out there on the airwaves what the issues were. certainly, the telephone metadata had been disclosed by the "new york times" and then partially declassified by president bush in late 2005. there was conversation out there. congress can do that and that should happen. there could be public hearings as there are now public hearings about competing versions of the lawstial fixes for the that we have. yes, a portion of this is classified. exactly how it works is classified. why do we want to tip our playbook to the bad guys? that can be explained to the public, too. want sho
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